Madagascar

Planetary Health Spoken Word Performance by Steve Andriamasy

National Geographic Explorer Dr. Christopher Golden and his team of Harvard Planetary Health Scholars spent six weeks in Madagascar to better understand the human health impacts of environmental change. This series of stories will document this journey across Madagascar through their personal experiences. Steve Andriamasy is a renowned spoken word performer in Madagascar. In 2017,…

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Planetary Health Spoken Word Performance by Makwa Joma

National Geographic Explorer Dr. Christopher Golden and his team of Harvard Planetary Health Scholars spent six weeks in Madagascar to better understand the human health impacts of environmental change. This series of stories will document this journey across Madagascar through their personal experiences. Makwa Joma is a renowned spoken word performer in Madagascar. In 2017,…

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Fossils and Taboos: What to expect when doing paleontological fieldworks in Madagascar

By Tsiory Andrianavalona

Nosy Makamby is a gem for paleontologists working on Miocene sedimentary formations in Madagascar. This small island is geologically rich, its sedimentary layers are very fossiliferous, and our discoveries until now are very encouraging. The proximity of the sea also brings in fresh breezes which are very welcome under the hot sun of August. I do love my job–it allows me to work with amazing teammates and discover my country from North to South. As a scientist, I tend to be objective and rational, but through my paleontological field experiences, I was exposed more than once to unusual situations that are tightly tied to people’s beliefs….

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It always starts with a question: Teaching science in Madagascar

I wrote to you last as a Princeton doctoral student in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, where I studied the transmission dynamics of potentially zoonotic–or human-infecting–viruses carried by Malagasy fruit bats. Disease ecologists like myself use mathematical modeling tools to understand how pathogens persist in finite host populations over time–and to predict when such pathogens are most likely to pass from one individual to another. I wrapped up that PhD a few months ago and started a postdoctoral fellowship with the Miller Institute at UC Berkeley, but I’m still chasing answers to many of the same questions as before….

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Two Pink Lines and the Fear of Death: Why Community Orientation is Critical to Public Health Interventions

National Geographic Explorer Dr. Christopher Golden and his team of Harvard Planetary Health Scholars spent six weeks in Madagascar to better understand the human health impacts of environmental change. This series of stories will document this journey across Madagascar through the personal experiences of these students. By Sarah Guth, UC Berkeley graduate student and Planetary…

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Why Plentiful Fish Stocks Protect Human Health and Wellbeing

National Geographic Explorer Dr. Christopher Golden and his team of Harvard Planetary Health Scholars spent six weeks in Madagascar to better understand the human health impacts of environmental change. This post is part of the series of stories that document a journey across Madagascar through the personal experiences of these students….

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The Faces Behind the Statistics of Environmental Change

National Geographic Explorer Dr. Christopher Golden and his team of Harvard Planetary Health Scholars spent six weeks in Madagascar to better understand the human health impacts of environmental change. This series of stories will document this journey across Madagascar through the personal experiences of these students….

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From Jamaica to Madagascar: Consistent Meaning of Resilience and Need for Planetary Health

National Geographic Explorer Dr. Christopher Golden and his team of Harvard Planetary Health Scholars spent six weeks in Madagascar to better understand the human health impacts of environmental change. This series of stories will document this journey across Madagascar through the personal experiences of these students.   By Hakeem Angulu, Harvard University undergraduate and Planetary…

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February 2, 2014: Walking from Siberia to Australia, Prepping Putin’s $51 Billion Bash and More

  Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Recapping her three-year expedition that made her…

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NG Young Explorer Behind the Scenes: The Good, the Bad, and the Unforgettable

National Geographic Young Explorers Grantee Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of…

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Fieldwork – Or How To Still Explore The World À La Indiana Jones

National Geographic Young Explorer Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of opportunity,…

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Severe Erosion Reveals Earth’s Treasures

National Geographic Young Explorer Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of opportunity,…

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A Christmas of the Coastal Kind

National Geographic Young Explorer Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of opportunity,…

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High Moon Over the Amazon: The Quest for the Monkeys of the Night

In total darkness in the dripping rain forest of Madagascar’s Ranomafana National Park, the accomplished primatologist Patricia Chapple Wright skipped along a rough trail she’d prepared for us jungle neophytes to explore the nocturnal world of lemurs, frogs, and many other species new and strange to us. While I fretted about snakes and leeches I…

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

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Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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