Marc Silver

By Sasha Ingber We’ll be interviewing various experts about the impact of Hurricane Sandy and what lies ahead. For the big picture about hurricanes, we spoke to Jim Kossin, atmospheric research scientist in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Climatic Data Center. Could Hurricane Sandy be the result of climate change? It’s not fair...

I’m sure you’ve been wondering many things about the new Republican vice-presidential candidate, Paul Ryan. Because National Geographic is not a political publication, we will skip all the political issues and get right to the detail that caught our attention: Mr. Ryan likes to go “catfish noodling.” There doesn’t seem to be an accepted theory...

Thank you for being a friend, Betty White. “I’ve subscribed [to National Geographic magazine] for 60 years,” the 90-year-old actress told us on the eve of visiting Washington, D.C., for a Smithsonian Associates lecture and a book-signing at the National Zoo (her latest work is Betty & Friends: My Life at the Zoo). Asked what...

If you saw the Super Bowl halftime show, you probably wondered, “Who’s that guy in a toga bouncing crazily on a rope next to Madonna? And how’s he doing it?” The guy was Andy Lewis, a slacklining champion from California, and he did it after many, many years of practice. Slacklining is different from tightrope...

Honey badger don’t care. That is the catch phrase from a viral YouTube video that uses National Geographic Wild tv footage with new, smart aleck (and occasionally vulgar) narration to go along with scenes of the honey badger running backwards, chasing a jackal, and eating a cobra that stings it (“oh, the honey badgers are...

In the film 50/50, a 27-year-old man is diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, called Schwannoma neurofibrosarcoma. His odds of survival: 50 percent. Medical experts, family, friends—even WebMD—proceed to offer the patient a whirlwind of scientific data, raising more questions than answers about the nature of cancer. We contacted Anna Franklin, medical director of...

As we’ve mentioned before, some of us at National Geographic are fans of the globe-trotting television series The Amazing Race. In this season’s premiere, passports played a starring role. A team of former Vegas showgirls stopped at a gas station in Los Angeles to get directions to the airport. After driving off, one of them...

Our Idiot Brother,starring Paul Rudd as the idiot, is actually full of idiots. Rudd’s character Ned is an organic farmer. One of his fellow (idiot) farmers oversleeps one day and blames the rooster at the farm, claiming that it did not crow, probably because it was “depressed.” This made us wonder: Do roosters always crow...

Do alligators really eat marshmallows? We had to find out after watching True Blood. For the uninitiated, True Blood is an HBO television series wherein vampires coexist with humans in a town called Bon Temps, La. In Sunday’s episode, Tommy kills his parents and, with the help of his brother Sam, disposes of them in...

Even if you—like many of us—have never heard of Cambodian psych-pop, you may have heard some recently. A song by the California-based band Dengue Fever, 1000 Tears of a Tarantula, is featured in the soundtrack of the new movie The Hangover: Part Two. Where did this trippy music come from? East meeting west. As the...

What better way to start off the day after World Oceans Day than with the world premiere of the underwater video for a previously unreleased Paul McCartney song? The song, composed in the 1980s, is called Blue Sway, and that’s exactly the feeling in the imagery created by noted surf filmmaker Jack McCoy. Using a...

Before I begin this post, I have a special message for my cat: Rosie, you may not play with my iPad! Now you may wonder why a cat would even want to play with an iPad. But it turns out that Friskies, the catfood company, has created three games especially for cats: “CatFishing,” “Tasty Treasures...

So you think you’re smarter than a National Geographic Bee contestant? The 54 finalists will face off on May 24 and 25. Some PBS stations will broadcast the event, as will the National Geographic channel starting on June 13 at 6:30 p.m. ET, for four nights. If you’d like to see whether you measure up,...