Rachel Kaufman

By Rachel Kaufman Many people are disgusted by the hagfish. These squirmy, eel-looking creatures are known primarily for two repellent traits: eating dying animals from the inside out, and oozing four cups of slime in a fraction of a second. But Douglas Fudge, an integrative biologist at Canada’s University of Guelph, in Ontario, has given us...

By Rachel Kaufman As long as they’re in someone else’s house, termites are rather fascinating creatures. The social insects live in colonies, like bees or ants, and build large nests that can stretch 300 feet (91 meters) across. There are more than 2,600 species of termites—and more than one quadrillion individual termites—on Earth. Their ability...

By Rachel Kaufman As long as they’re in someone else’s house, termites are rather fascinating creatures. The social insects live in colonies, like bees or ants, and build large nests that can stretch 300 feet (91 meters) across. There are more than 2,600 species of termites—and more than one quadrillion individual termites—on Earth. Their ability...

By Rachel Kaufman As long as they’re in someone else’s house, termites are rather fascinating creatures. The social insects live in colonies, like bees or ants, and build large nests that can stretch 300 feet (91 meters) across. There are more than 2,600 species of termites—and more than one quadrillion individual termites—on Earth. Their ability...

National Geographic Fellow Barton Seaver, a Washington, D.C.-based chef, writer, and ocean advocate talks to Green Guide about genetically engineered salmon. By Rachel Kaufman Last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that genetically engineered salmon is safe to eat, but has not yet officially approved the fish for sale. The final-approval process could...

Urban farming visionary Will Allen expands his services, growing even more healthy food in the concrete jungle. Two feet of compost, Allen says, is enough to turn asphalt into a cornfield. By Rachel Kaufman Grow, bloom, thrive: that’s Will Allen’s motto. Allen is the founder and director of Growing Power, a Milwaukee-based nonprofit that helps...

By Rachel Kaufman It seems totally counterintuitive. After all, the Chesapeake Bay is in a pickle right now because its oyster population, which once filtered impurities from the Bay at a rate of 50 gallons of water per oyster per day. The entire volume of the bay (about 19 trillion gallons) was purified every week....

By Rachel Kaufman It’s getting late, and the Shark Scientist is getting hungry. He’s been at the TEDxOilSpill conference for hours, reporting, interviewing, and learning, and he’s only eaten a handful of pretzels, despite the venue-provided sandwiches and fruit. Hey, you were probably a picky eater at age 11, too. Sam Atkin, editor of a...

By Rachel Kaufman In Washington, D.C., for the TEDxOilSpill event, dozens of speakers are proposing solutions to the disaster unfolding in the Gulf of Mexico. Many more are showing us what we have to lose, and it’s a lot: animal habitats; endangered species; clean water; seafood to feed our nation and our economy; hundreds of...

By Rachel Kaufman At TedXOilSpill, a daylong event in Washington, D.C. trying to find solutions to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Oceana CEO Andrew Sharpless took the time to answer ten questions about oil and energy usually asked by “people who don’t support policies that could create something good out of this catastrophe.” (Oceana is...

By Rachel Kaufman When Jane Goodall speaks, you get this feeling like you could quit your job and move to the jungle to save animals, and it wouldn’t be that crazy. No, when Jane speaks, you feel like you should. And that you’d actually make a difference. Why not, anyway? That’s what she did in...