Voices for Wildlife

Donde los Glaciares Desaparecen

Donde los Glaciares Desaparecen (Relatos inéditos de la Patagonia) Parcialmente enterrado en la arena reposa el olvidado cráneo de una ballena adulta. Sus tejidos han sido lentamente erosionados por el incesante vaivén de las olas. La blanca escultura ósea contrasta con la delgada capa de oscura arena que cubre la paya. Su puntiaguda parte frontal…

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Return of the Penguins?

This is Part Four of “Voyage of the Yellow-eyed Penguin” (See Part One, Part Two, Part Three) Last explorations of Eden 14 November 2017 Waterfall Inlet and Lake Hinemoa Today started out pretty OK. Just another morning in the subantarctic, in an impossible cove full of waterfalls, rainbows, and yellow-eyed penguins. Eight penguins swam up to and under…

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Governments unite to conserve the world’s heaviest flying animal

Asian range countries of the world’s heaviest flying bird, the great bustard, will coordinate the conservation of highly threatened populations of the species after a unanimous show of support at the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Migratory Species. Weighing up to 46 pounds, the great bustard (Otis tarda) is the heaviest animal capable…

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Two heroic efforts to save the King of the Jungle

In celebration of Big Cat Week, National Geographic salutes the heroic efforts of conservationists to save Lion populations from poachers and habitat conflict, such as the Ewaso Lions Warrior Watch project and the anti-snaring campaign of the Zambian Carnivore Program. Samburu warriors, left, keeping tabs on a lioness; Thandiwe Mweetwa, right, tracking a lion’s radio transmitter.   Meet…

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Big Cat Week video: Tracking tigers is just as dangerous as It sounds

Matthew Luskin is a conservation biologist, wildlife ecologist, and National Geographic grantee. He spent a year in the rain forest of Indonesia tracking tigers through the remaining three largest national parks—and it was seriously dangerous. “When there’s a tiger around you can’t sleep. You can barely eat. You can’t do anything because all you are…

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Cheetahs in southern Africa are closer to extinction than thought, National Geographic–supported research finds

A comprehensive assessment of cheetah populations in southern Africa supported by the National Geographic Society reveals the dire state of one of the planet’s most iconic big cats, the Society said in a news statement today. “In a study published today in the open-access journal PeerJ, researchers present evidence that low cheetah population estimates in…

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Big Cat Week video: What it takes to rescue a fierce leopard

What would you do if you came face-to-face with a 175 pound, agitated leopard? If you’re conservation power-couple Marlice and Rudie van Vuuren, you’ve been on the receiving end of such a scenario about 112 times. The National Geographic Society’s Big Cats Initiative supports scientists and conservationists working to save big cats in the wild….

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Big Cat Week video: Helping cheetahs find a mate

You may not have had “cheetah matchmaker” featured at your high school career fair, but that’s just what Vincent van der Merwe’s business card may as well read. But trying to repopulate the highly vulnerable species can be as dangerous as it is exciting. Watch the video to see what happens when van der Merwe tries to translocate a very…

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Cheetahs: Fast facts about world’s fastest cat

This beautiful animal is threatened by loss of habitat and prey, as well as conflict with humans. As a result, the cheetah is classified as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red list, and, today, an estimated 9,000-12,000 remain in Africa.   The fastest land animal in the world, a cheetah can reach 69.5 mph in just three seconds – faster than a sports…

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About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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