Voices for Wildlife

By David Greer Like many aspiring conservationists, I was captivated as a youngster while watching videos of Jane Goodall’s early years in the forest interacting with the fascinating chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania.  I was hooked.   I was determined that I would end up working in Africa on their behalf–it was merely a...

By Don Church, Global Wildlife Conservation president Before we even had a chance to launch our first expedition this fall in Global Wildlife Conservation’s Search for Lost Species, we somehow amazingly struck gold in Guatemala. That gold was in the form of the brilliantly yellow-hued Jackson’s Climbing Salamander, a species missing to science since its...

(Patagonia’s Untold Stories) It has finally pushed itself through the entangled root mats. Months of development feeding on wet detritus have come to an end. It will now emerge as a full-fledged adult. The upper portion of its body hangs perpendicular to the rock wall, exposed to the elements. It begins to break free from...

Wild Bird Trust presents the 111th Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week. Each one of these birds has their own unique life history. There are birds that migrate and those that are resident, birds that scavenge carrion and birds that eat nectar, birds that are active at night and those that are diurnal....

Register for WildSpeak today: www.wildpseak.org This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Written by Betsy Painter with images from iLCP Fellows. So bring on the rebels, the ripples from pebbles, the painters, and poets, and plays… here’s to the fools who dream, crazy as they may seem. –La...

Note: This piece was updated on Nov. 14, 2017, with terminology to appropriately describe Indigenous communities in Australia. Flying across the width of Australia in July, from Sydney in the southeast to Broome in the northwest, I was mesmerized by the sweeping floodplains of the channel country and the seemingly endless rolling dunes of the...

Much like anyone in the northern hemisphere on the first warm Saturday of the year, each spring the Eastern massasauga rattlesnake (EMR) emerges from the holes that it hibernates in all winter ready for some sun and a good meal to kick-start its growth and reproduction for the year. And each spring, a group of...

My work in Brazil focuses on invasive species on islands, but to see a different side of conservation I have joined the Projeto Tamanduá 2017 course in the Pantanal. The Pantanal is the largest wetland in the world with the highest concentration of species in the Americas. There are an estimated 1,000 bird, 400 fish...

Bikepacking Patagonia’s abandoned tracks in search of insects. (R. Isaí Madriz) My bicycle is knee deep in mud. The snowline on the nearby mountains is closer than the previous day. The abandoned track has been softened by the stomping of cattle. After an hour of pushing my loaded bike half a mile through the mud,...

In Brazil WWF is partnering with TRIADE to undertake a trial rat eradication on Ilha do Meio, one of the small offshore islands of Fernando de Noronha. I visited the island this week so that the team undertaking the project could bring me up to speed on their progress so far. Fernando de Noronha is...

By Gini Cowell, Elephant Aware, and Joyce Poole and Petter Granli of ElephantVoices This is a tale about a beautiful and gentle matriarch from the Maasai Mara, Kenya. Her lack of tusks and the ‘flap-cut’ notch in her left ear make her easily recognizable, even to the most inexperienced observer. Rangers, working for Elephant Aware...

Touring through the Amazon I had the unique opportunity to spend a day visiting the small seasonally flooded islands of the Rio Negro. This dynamic landscape plays a huge role regulating local biodiversity. Our tour guide first lands us for a short walk on one of the small islands in the Parque Nacional de Anavilhanas....

(Patagonia’s Untold Stories)   Its skin is splitting open down its back. Three pairs of lateral attachment points keep its streamlined body glued to the submerged rock. It will use the glacial raging torrent to its advantage. With the last air in its body, it inflates its thorax to free itself from its pupal skin. It...