Ideas & Insight from Explorers

Latest Insights

Making the Unseen Seen: The True Cost of Oil Spills

In the dark, early hours of October 13th, 2016, the Nathan E. Stewart tugboat and articulated barge surged south through the vast, turbulent waters modernly known as Seaforth Channel in the heart of Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest, in Heiltsuk First Nation territories. The American-based tug (also referred to as the “NES”) was returning to Vancouver…

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Can We Protect the Last Intact Forests of the World in the 21st Century?

We are now at a point in the course of human history where there are only a handful of places on Earth that are not severely altered by the footprint of large-scale industrial activities. Those within parts of the Earth where trees are dominant are termed “intact” or “primary” forests. A few weeks ago I…

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A Tribute to Environmentalist Nathaniel Reed

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. On July 11th Nathaniel ‘Nat’ Reed, a great environmental advocate, passed away at age 84. Mr. Reed had many accomplishments and tirelessly…

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Keeping Carnivores, Connectivity, and Culture Intact in Mesoamerica’s Moskitia

By John Polisar In early 2017, I participated in an ecological survey led by Conservation International to assess the biological attributes of archaeological site in Honduras known as Ciudad Blanca, or the Lost City of the Monkey God. The area was so remote that we were helicoptered in. We walked through rivers and atop ridges,…

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Mapping the Critical Role of Indigenous Peoples in Global Conservation

By Stephen Garnett and James Watson Hazda, Aranda, Orang Asli, Yanomami and Cherokee – Indigenous Peoples have many names around the world. With such diversity in names and cultures, some people might not be aware of the many things that Indigenous Peoples share. One is deep cultural attachment to their land and sea – an…

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Congress working to take fisheries backward 20 years

By Safina Center Staff It took the United States decades to develop and perfect an effective fisheries management plan that helps keep enough fish to feed both the nation’s people and its animals. The landmark legislation that turned around the country’s widespread overfishing problem was called the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, passed in…

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Top 25 Bird Interactions

This week we asked the Wild Bird Revolution followers to capture interactions between birds, and we were not disappointed! This outstanding collection gives us unique insights into the many social interactions that birds have every day. Courtship, raising chicks, competition and fighting are just a few of the moments captured in this collection. Thank you…

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Elephants with a purpose

Why did 53 elephants travel more than 1 250 km across three different countries this month? Here’s why. In the uMkhuze section of iSimangaliso Wetland Park, part of the Lubombo Transfrontier Conservation Area, elephants are flourishing. Following the reintroduction of the species into the game reserve during the 1990s, the numbers rapidly grew to a…

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The Inspiring Way Adventures in the Field Are Driving Innovations in the Lab

By Andrew Howley of Adventure Scientists This year at the Aspen Ideas Festival: Spotlight Health, just a few days after joining his fellow Nat Geo Explorers at the 2018 Explorers Festival, our founder, Gregg Treinish, had the opportunity to speak via Facebook Live about what our organization is doing to connect scientists in need of…

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Indigenous leaders of Pimachiowin Aki Are a Beacon of Hope As World Heritage Designation Becomes Official

The Bloodvein River, one of many significant rivers, streams and water bodies within Pimachiowin Aki. Photo Jeff Wells. It’s part of what may be the largest single block of intact forest in the largest intact forest landscape left in human history and the largest remaining landscape of southern boreal forest left in Canada. Millions of…

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Caribou Calving Grounds?

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text by iLCP Fellow Peter Mather It is 1am as I drive down Alaska’s straightest and smoothest road. We are on our…

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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