Ideas & Insight from Explorers

Latest Insights

Navigating Space Archaeology

Sarah Parcak is a space archaeologist. And, with National Geographic’s help, she wants you to be one, too. An Egyptologist by training (that’s the “archaeologist” part of her title), Parcak uses satellite imagery (there’s the “space” part) to uncover clues about ancient sites possibly hidden in vegetation and land-use patterns. Processing satellite images in near-infrared…

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Clarence Dutton: Poet of the Grand Canyon

The 33 founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s upcoming 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins An army captain with a soldierly…

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Shivani Bhalla: ‘The most important word is conservationist

Shivani Bhalla is a scientist and explorer working with National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative and Kenya’s Samburu communities to reduce livestock loss to carnivores. In particular, Bhalla monitors the movement and health of Kenya’s 2,000 remaining lions—lions that live both inside and outside protected areas. Despite being one of the continent’s most iconic species, lion…

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Traveling the World to Study Its Waters

The 33 founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s upcoming 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins For being related to such a…

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Archive Discoveries: Exploration of Mount Kennedy

Mount Kennedy was named by Canadian Prime Minister Lester Pearson after John F. Kennedy. The film documents the mapping and exploration of Mount Kennedy — co-sponsored expedition by National Geographic Society and Boston’s Museum of Science. The expedition was led by Bradford Washburn, who first discovered the peak on his NGS-sponsored Yukon Expedition of 1935….

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William Dall: National Geographic Founder and Pioneer of Alaskan Exploration

The 33 founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s upcoming 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. William Dall (1845-1927), spent much of his boyhood wading in…

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EIA: Coal-Fired Electricity Generation, Coal Production to Decrease in 2018

A near record amount of coal-fired electricity is poised to go offline this year, according to recently released data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Set to retire in the United States this year are some 13 gigawatts (GW) at more than a dozen units—that’s an amount second only to the nearly 15 GW of…

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Elsie May Bell Grosvenor: ‘First Lady’ of the National Geographic Society

From early childhood to her last year at 86, Elsie May Bell Grosvenor was uniquely linked to the National Geographic Society, wrote Gilbert Hovey Grosvenor in a tribute published in the July 1965 issue of National Geographic Magazine. Responding to the many messages of sympathy he received from Society members when Elsie died, the former editor of the magazine said: “It reaffirms the unique spirit of the National Geographic Society as my wife and I envisioned it together nearly seventy years ago–the spirit of a great and enduring family dedicated to knowledge and understanding.”…

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Two Pink Lines and the Fear of Death: Why Community Orientation is Critical to Public Health Interventions

National Geographic Explorer Dr. Christopher Golden and his team of Harvard Planetary Health Scholars spent six weeks in Madagascar to better understand the human health impacts of environmental change. This series of stories will document this journey across Madagascar through the personal experiences of these students. By Sarah Guth, UC Berkeley graduate student and Planetary…

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A Historic Journey Into Death Valley

The 33 founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s upcoming 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins When he was 12-years-old, Rogers Birnie…

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Legacy of the Leakeys

Generations of women have explored our world with the National Geographic Society, and three generations of women explorers from the Leakey family have brought the history of the world to our community. In 1978, Mary Leakey and her team left a lasting impression on the world of paleoanthropology when they discovered the “Laetoli Footprints,” trace…

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From Early ‘Lady Writer,’ Washington Cherry Blossoms and a National Geographic Legacy

Eliza Scidmore’s writings impressed the scientists and other eminent men who founded the National Geographic Society in 1888. Two years after she joined in 1890, they elected her corresponding secretary, making her the first woman on the Society’s board. A contributing writer and editor of National Geographic magazine for two decades, her article “Young Japan” in the July 1914 issue was probably the first time a woman had photographs in National Geographic. Captivated by the beauty of cherry blossoms the first time she went to Japan, in 1885, she carried home an idea that indelibly shaped the public landscape of the U.S. capital: the flowering cherry trees that bloom every spring in Potomac Park, attracting more than a million visitors each year….

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About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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