Ideas & Insight from Explorers

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Complicated Economics Challenging Nuclear

Speaking at the International Petroleum Week conference in London on Wednesday, International Energy Agency (IEA) Executive Director Fatih Birol voiced concerns that the United States and Europe aren’t investing enough in nuclear power, while China is charging ahead. “China is coming back strong. Today there are about 60 nuclear power plants under construction and more…

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A Whale of a Day

By Nadim Parves [The is the fifth blog in a series about the WCS-led marine megafauna survey, which is gathering data on whales, sea turtles, sharks, and other marine species inhabiting the coastal waters of Bangladesh. Data from the effort will identify biologically important locations for future consideration as marine protected areas.] As we sailed southeast from…

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Video: Rare Inside Look Into the Lives of the Last Nomads of India

This short video captures a rare inside look into the lives of some of the last Nomadic people in the world. Video by Asha Stuart/National Geographic Explorer The Nomadic gypsies of India live a life of constantly questioning and searching for the unknown. Originating from the Northern Indian state of Rajasthan, the Gypsies cross the…

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Forecasting diseases one image at a time

An image from a Landsat satellite of Brazil, where the Amazon flows into the Rio Negro and Solimoes River. Satellite imagery like this will be coupled with epidemiological data, meteorological data, and Internet data streams to identify conditions that could potentially lead to disease outbreaks. By Nick Generous Public health is like your plumbing: You…

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“Catching air”: Measuring the amount of indoor air pollution we breathe and how it impacts our health

Household air pollution from inefficient cooking and heating with solid fuels (e.g., wood, coal) causes millions of deaths each year. Improving the stoves and fuels people use can potentially reduce exposures to pollution and improve health. This photo essay portrays household air pollution and its impacts on cardiovascular health in rural Chinese communities in the Tibetan Plateau mountains, and the field-work activities of an international team trying to study it….

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Meet the Man at the Nexus of Taipei City’s Environmental Movement

I met Martin at a taco shop in one of Taipei City’s downtown side alleys. My experience with Mexican food in Beijing didn’t bring back fond memories, but this place looked legit. The counter was filled with steel tins of freshly chopped meat and the guacamole looked green (in Beijing it was a strange murky…

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Community Water Systems on the Rise

Water providers, essential to quenching our daily thirst, usually aren’t household names, their logo swooshed across a baseball cap. If we think of them at all, it might be a big city utility. And yet, many urban neighborhoods, and vast stretches of rural areas, are served by tiny, often invisible community operators. In Latin America alone, over 145,000 small community operators serve 70,000,000 people. They are making good – or at least trying to – on the human right to water and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals….

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Days in the Bay of Bengal: Between Dreams and Reality

By Manzura Khan [Note: This is the fourth blog in a series about the WCS-led marine megafauna survey, which is gathering data on whales, sea turtles, sharks, and other marine species inhabiting the coastal waters of Bangladesh. Data from the effort will identify biologically important locations for future consideration as marine protected areas.] In 2011, I was…

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Archive Discoveries: NASA’s Distinguished Service Award for ‘Freedom 7’

During the early days of NASA and height of the space race in the 1960s, the National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration loaned two of our staff photographers — Dean Conger and Luis Marden to NASA to document their efforts to send a man into space. On May 5, 1961, astronaut Alan B….

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Top 25 Backyard Birds

Wild Bird Trust presents the Top 25 Backyard Birds! This week, in honour of the Great Backyard Bird Count, all birds featured are backyard birds. Backyards, or as some say, gardens, are excellent refuges for a wide range of birdlife. In a rapidly urbanising world gardens will become more and more important to sustaining bird…

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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