Photograph by Michael Nichols

Changing Planet

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The Poisoning of the Amazon

By: Jacqueline Gerson, Kelsey Lansdale and Melissa Marchese The pitter-patter of rain echoes through our metal boat as we chug down the Madre de Dios River in the Peruvian rainforest. Trees line the riverbanks, just visible through the dense fog and heavy rain, while macaws and capuchin monkeys screech in the background; the Amazon is…

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Upgrading ecosystems and why we should save top predators

Where I work in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique, species that have co-evolved over millennia still roam and interact freely together in a protected wilderness.  Gorongosa is among the fortunate, twenty-six years after a devastating civil war and the relentless hunting for meat and ivory and skins tore this ecosystem apart, the Park now brims with…

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When Flood Waters Subside, Termite Troubles Can Rise

By Marlene Cimons As floodwaters brought by Hurricane Florence subside, homeowners, businesses and the government face the long task of cleaning up. But as the crews do their work, there is a little-talked-about danger in the aftermath of severe storms like this one — Formosan termites. This invasive species is a plague on homes and structures across the…

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Cool Forests Conference Puts Boreal Forest on World Stage

. What makes the occasion so remarkable is the coming together of hundreds of people from around the globe who study and care about the world’s Boreal Forests.  The event, called the “Cool Forests at Risk” conference, will encompass four days of intense learning, listening and collaboration related to the world’s largest intact forest areas…

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Conservation Takes One Scientist to the Extreme

By Marlene Cimons Conservationist Joel Berger lives in the extreme. That’s the best word to describe his travels, and what he does. He goes to extreme environments — not any of the usual tourist destinations — to study how animals there adapt. These places are hot and cold deserts, for example, the uppermost regions of the tallest of mountains, and the…

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Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas and Climate Change in Canada’s Boreal Forest

By Cheryl Chetkiewicz [Note: this is the third and final blog in this WCS series during the Global Climate Action Summit, taking place in San Francisco this week, examining the role of Indigenous Peoples in protecting forest resources and mitigating climate change.] At 5.6 million square kilometres, Canada’s boreal region is one of the largest forests…

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Protect Indigenous Rights and Culture to Confront the Climate Crisis

By Lilian Painter [Note: this is the second in a 3-part series during the Global Climate Action Summit, taking place in San Francisco this week, examining the role of Indigenous Peoples in protecting forest resources and mitigating climate change.] This week in San Francisco, government and business leaders, investors, and average citizens are gathering to inspire…

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Securing Intact Forests and Indigenous Livelihoods in DR Congo

By Deo Kujirakwinja and Michael Painter [Note: this is the first in a 3-part series during the Global Climate Action Summit, taking place in San Francisco this week, examining the role of Indigenous Peoples in protecting forest resources and mitigating climate change.] In eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the Batwa people have played a…

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Into the Wild – For Rain | Part I. British Columbia

By Eve-Lyn S. Hinckley, National Geographic Explorer and Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder The American Cordillera is a jigsaw of mountain ranges that curls southward from the Alaskan coast through my home range, the Colorado Rocky Mountains, to its end in the Antarctic Peninsula. I’m making my first stop along its…

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Lancetfish are providing a unique glimpse into the ocean’s twilight zone

By Jessica Perelman, Guest Blogger When Assistant Professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, Anela Choy first conducted doctoral research on the feeding habits of large midwater fish predators, it quickly became clear to her that prey items found in the stomachs of longnose lancetfish (Alepisaurus ferox) were hardly digested and fairly easy to identify….

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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