Human Journey

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The Poisoning of the Amazon

By: Jacqueline Gerson, Kelsey Lansdale and Melissa Marchese The pitter-patter of rain echoes through our metal boat as we chug down the Madre de Dios River in the Peruvian rainforest. Trees line the riverbanks, just visible through the dense fog and heavy rain, while macaws and capuchin monkeys screech in the background; the Amazon is…

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A Wilderness Adventure in a National Forest

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Photos by iLCP Senior Fellow Dave Showalter iLCP has been working in partnership with the National Forest Foundation and U.S. Forest Service…

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Cool Forests Conference Puts Boreal Forest on World Stage

. What makes the occasion so remarkable is the coming together of hundreds of people from around the globe who study and care about the world’s Boreal Forests.  The event, called the “Cool Forests at Risk” conference, will encompass four days of intense learning, listening and collaboration related to the world’s largest intact forest areas…

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Conservation Takes One Scientist to the Extreme

By Marlene Cimons Conservationist Joel Berger lives in the extreme. That’s the best word to describe his travels, and what he does. He goes to extreme environments — not any of the usual tourist destinations — to study how animals there adapt. These places are hot and cold deserts, for example, the uppermost regions of the tallest of mountains, and the…

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So You Want to Explore the Land of a Thousand Rhythms?

This is the latest post in the Colombia Blog Series by Kike Calvo, which profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on Colombia related to journalism, ecotourism, visual anthropology, exploration and photography. This article belongs to the author’s lifelong series The Güepajé Project. For the past few weeks I embarked on a rather remarkable music exploration around Colombia with Colombia Photo Expeditions….

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Los diez mejores consejos sobre cómo inspirar a las comunidades a restaurar el medio ambiente

Los Diez Mejores Consejos La conservación es un desafío tanto social como biológico. Durante cinco años llevando a cabo un proyecto participativo de investigación de ballenas en un pequeño pueblo mexicano, aprendí tanto sobre el comportamiento humano como sobre los mamíferos marinos. Recopilamos datos innovadores sobre ballenas jorobadas y delfines durante nuestro estudio de 1600…

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Top ten tips on how to inspire communities to restore the environment

I spent the past five years running a participatory whale research project in a tiny village in SW Pacific Mexico. We collected groundbreaking data on humpback whales and dolphins during our 1600-hour study, but the real success was inspiring and supporting the 600-person community to take ownership of their struggling marine environment’s health. After five years, the community…

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Stemming the spread of HIV by accurately predicting its spread

By Thomas Leitner, Ph.D. One of the challenges with stemming the spread of HIV lies in understanding how it is spread. Because HIV mutates so rapidly, it has historically been difficult—if not impossible—to trace exactly who transmitted the virus to whom. Without that understanding, it’s easy for the disease to run unfettered through a population—with…

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“If a tiger kills our cattle, we don’t feel angry”

The Chenchu tribe think of the tiger as their brother. They understand their forest and its wildlife better than anybody else and have shaped, nurtured and protected this environment for millennia. Yet their lives are being destroyed by government efforts to conserve this animal. Survival International researcher Fiore Longo spent time with them in Amrabad…

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Making the Unseen Seen: The True Cost of Oil Spills

In the dark, early hours of October 13th, 2016, the Nathan E. Stewart tugboat and articulated barge surged south through the vast, turbulent waters modernly known as Seaforth Channel in the heart of Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest, in Heiltsuk First Nation territories. The American-based tug (also referred to as the “NES”) was returning to Vancouver…

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Can We Protect the Last Intact Forests of the World in the 21st Century?

We are now at a point in the course of human history where there are only a handful of places on Earth that are not severely altered by the footprint of large-scale industrial activities. Those within parts of the Earth where trees are dominant are termed “intact” or “primary” forests. A few weeks ago I…

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A Tribute to Environmentalist Nathaniel Reed

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. On July 11th Nathaniel ‘Nat’ Reed, a great environmental advocate, passed away at age 84. Mr. Reed had many accomplishments and tirelessly…

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About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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