Ideas & Insight from Explorers

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Legacy of the Leakeys

Generations of women have explored our world with the National Geographic Society, and three generations of women explorers from the Leakey family have brought the history of the world to our community. In 1978, Mary Leakey and her team left a lasting impression on the world of paleoanthropology when they discovered the “Laetoli Footprints,” trace…

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From Early ‘Lady Writer,’ Washington Cherry Blossoms and a National Geographic Legacy

Eliza Scidmore’s writings impressed the scientists and other eminent men who founded the National Geographic Society in 1888. Two years after she joined in 1890, they elected her corresponding secretary, making her the first woman on the Society’s board. A contributing writer and editor of National Geographic magazine for two decades, her article “Young Japan” in the July 1914 issue was probably the first time a woman had photographs in National Geographic. Captivated by the beauty of cherry blossoms the first time she went to Japan, in 1885, she carried home an idea that indelibly shaped the public landscape of the U.S. capital: the flowering cherry trees that bloom every spring in Potomac Park, attracting more than a million visitors each year….

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Marcus Baker: National Geographic Founder and Editor

The 33 founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s upcoming 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins In late 1872, Dr. William H….

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Archive Discovery of Week: Gilbert H. Grosvenor’s 60th Anniversary Party

Happy 130th Anniversary National Geographic! To celebrate, we are showcasing Gilbert Hovey Grosvenor, our ninth President and “Master Builder of the National Geographic Society.”  In the clip, Gilbert H. Grosvenor is honored for his Diamond Jubliee (60th) anniversary at the National Geographic Society.  After he is “pinned,” his son Melville Bell Grosvenor speaks of the impact…

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Setting Sail for the Bangladesh Marine Megafauna Survey

By Elisabeth Fahrni Mansur [Note: This is the first in a series of blogs about the Bangladesh Marine Megafauna Survey being conducted by the WCS Bangladesh program]. The densely populated country of Bangladesh is a land crisscrossed by an intricate system of hundreds of rivers, including the mighty Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna river system. These enormous freshwater inputs,…

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FERC Rejects Proposed Grid Resiliency Rule, Issues New Order

The five members of the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on Monday unanimously rejected a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking from the Department of Energy (DOE) to change its rules to help coal and nuclear plants in the electricity markets FERC oversees (subscription). Instead it opened a new proceeding in which it calls on regional transmission organizations (RTOs) and independent system…

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The Story of National Geographic Society’s Youngest Founder

The 33 founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s upcoming 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins Robert Muldrow II, a geologist, was…

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Wondering about the Economic Impact of Ecotourism on Marine Mammals? Read Here…

Marine tourism is now considered a “new frontier of late-capitalist transformation”, producing more revenue than aquaculture and fisheries put together. For many coastal communities, this industry is becoming the most significant economic activity. Marine tourism spans from simple operations run by one or few people (charter fishing boat operators, sea kayak tour guides, scuba diving…

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To Fight Illegal Fishing, Authorities Tighten Many Nets at Once

In most industries, the crimes would spark an international outcry: Thousands of tons of a prized commodity stolen every day, leaving a long trail of victims and frustrated authorities. The commodity is fish. And the crime—illegal fishing—accounts for up to $23.5 billion worth of seafood every year. The perpetrators roam the global ocean, often in…

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Stream live Tonight 6:30pm EST: The Megatransect – reflections on a wilderness journey

Watch a live presentation tonight of a historic wilderness journey, video streaming tonight direct from National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C., beginning 6:30pm EST Tuesday, Jan. 9 .  Access through this link to Facebook Live OR this link to Livestream. Twenty years ago, conservationist Mike Fay led a team on a more than 3,000-mile grueling trek from the Republic of…

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About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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