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WCS Bangladesh Marine Megafauna Survey: Day Two with a New Discovery from F.B. Jobeda

By Shanta Shamsunnahar [Note: This is the third blog in a series about the WCS-led marine megafauna survey, which is gathering data on whales, sea turtles, sharks, and other marine species inhabiting the coastal waters of Bangladesh. Data from the effort will identify biologically important locations for future consideration as marine protected areas.] The WCS marine megafauna…

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Coastal States Oppose Offshore Drilling Proposal

Attorneys general of a dozen coastal states—North Carolina, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island and Virginia—are expressing opposition to the Trump administration’s proposal to expand development of oil and gas in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, calling it “outrageous” and “reckless.” In a letter, they called on U.S. Department of…

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Using Data to Democratize Ocean Philanthropy

Given the swirling, complex, synergistic, and increasingly dire threats to the ocean (from climate change, to overfishing, to pollution), and the smaller and smaller investments the federal government is making in solutions, it is critical to effectively leverage philanthropic dollars. One of the most promising things that happened last year for ocean conservation was the…

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Another Kind of Migration: A Visit to Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve

There has been plenty of news coverage lately about the state of foreign relations between Mexico and the United States. But there is one issue — or rather, species — that is continuing to bring the countries together: monarch butterflies. This week, I’m taking a break from my regular focus on refugee narratives, policy, and…

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Why I am obsessed with hummingbird pee…and torpor

Hummingbirds are tiny (and I mean, tiny) birds.

They use up energy very quickly and barely store any fat, so they really don’t have a backup generator to rely on if they come close to running out of fuel. I’m really interested in how they manage this limited energy over short time scales. That’s why I am obsessed with their pee and torpor. Learn why….

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Saving a Crown Jewel

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer   On a late January afternoon the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge trails are quiet,…

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World Wetlands Day salute: Okavango Delta and NatGeo’s Okavango Wilderness Project

In observance of World Wetlands Day, National Geographic salutes the heroic work of the Okavango Wilderness Project, working to preserve the largest freshwater wetland in Southern Africa — and the main source of water for a million people.  Spanning southern Angola, Namibia, and northern Botswana, the Okavango Basin is one of Africa’s richest places for biodiversity,…

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An Update Direct From the Okavango, for World Wetlands Day.

This year I am celebrating World Wetlands Day in Luanda, Angola where we have just launched the new Portuguese issue of the National Geographic magazine, featuring an article documenting our journey to the source of one of Africa’s most important wetland systems- the Okavango-Zambezi Basin. There is a new energy in the city, with a…

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Top 25 Wild Birds Against Spectacular Landscapes

Wild Bird Trust presents this week’s Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs Against Spectacular Landscapes. We were truly blown away by the amazing landscape and habitat shots that were submitted this week!  Birds are excellent indicators of habitat quality, when habitats are degraded only the generalist and opportunistic species will remain in the area, others will…

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

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Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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