Ideas & Insight from Explorers

Latest Insights

Into the Wild – For Rain | Part I. British Columbia

By Eve-Lyn S. Hinckley, National Geographic Explorer and Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder The American Cordillera is a jigsaw of mountain ranges that curls southward from the Alaskan coast through my home range, the Colorado Rocky Mountains, to its end in the Antarctic Peninsula. I’m making my first stop along its…

Read More

Lancetfish are providing a unique glimpse into the ocean’s twilight zone

By Jessica Perelman, Guest Blogger When Assistant Professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, Anela Choy first conducted doctoral research on the feeding habits of large midwater fish predators, it quickly became clear to her that prey items found in the stomachs of longnose lancetfish (Alepisaurus ferox) were hardly digested and fairly easy to identify….

Read More

Invention is Thriving Down Under: Australia Could Become a Seafood Star

A Tasmanian company has invented acoustics technology that feeds farmed shrimp and fish through sound. Other Australian ventures are working on turning abalone waste into bioactive pharmaceuticals, developing low-cost processes that clean fish-farming waters while nourishing commercial algae production, and more original solutions to seafood challenges. When people talk about seafood industry powerhouses, no one…

Read More

Stirrings in the Muck: Fiddler Crabs, Yellow-Crowned Night Herons Locked in Climate Change Dance

Thalia, it’s called, this upscale neighborhood in Virginia Beach that’s lined with red brick ranches shaded by tall loblolly pines. The community is a few short miles from the mouth of Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean beyond. Bounded on the west by Thalia Creek and on the north by the eastern branch of the…

Read More

Top 25 Grassland Birds

Grasslands are the world’s most altered ecosystem, frequently being converted for cropping, pastures or urbanisation. When grasslands are transformed by humans, this often pushes out sensitive grassland birds, for example the Great Indian Bustard, now listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. Fortunately some grassland birds, like the Eastern Meadowlark, are adaptive and…

Read More

So You Want to Explore the Land of a Thousand Rhythms?

This is the latest post in the Colombia Blog Series by Kike Calvo, which profiles interesting information, research and thoughts on Colombia related to journalism, ecotourism, visual anthropology, exploration and photography. This article belongs to the author’s lifelong series The Güepajé Project. For the past few weeks I embarked on a rather remarkable music exploration around Colombia with Colombia Photo Expeditions….

Read More

When sharks are fished-out from coral reefs, fish body shapes change

Sounds kinda weird.. but studying nearly identical coral reef systems off Australia, my collaborators and I discovered something unusual on the reefs subjected to nearly exclusive fishing of sharks—fish with significantly smaller eyes and tails. This provides evidence of body shape changes in fish due to human-driven shark declines from overfishing. In the study, our…

Read More

About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

Social Media