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World Wetlands Day salute: Okavango Delta and NatGeo’s Okavango Wilderness Project

In observance of World Wetlands Day, National Geographic salutes the heroic work of the Okavango Wilderness Project, working to preserve the largest freshwater wetland in Southern Africa — and the main source of water for a million people.  Spanning southern Angola, Namibia, and northern Botswana, the Okavango Basin is one of Africa’s richest places for biodiversity,…

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An Update Direct From the Okavango, for World Wetlands Day.

This year I am celebrating World Wetlands Day in Luanda, Angola where we have just launched the new Portuguese issue of the National Geographic magazine, featuring an article documenting our journey to the source of one of Africa’s most important wetland systems- the Okavango-Zambezi Basin. There is a new energy in the city, with a…

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Top 25 Wild Birds Against Spectacular Landscapes

Wild Bird Trust presents this week’s Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs Against Spectacular Landscapes. We were truly blown away by the amazing landscape and habitat shots that were submitted this week!  Birds are excellent indicators of habitat quality, when habitats are degraded only the generalist and opportunistic species will remain in the area, others will…

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Chasing Truth (Part 1): Taxi Rides & Plastic Plants

“环保 (huánbǎo)? Environmental Protection? That’s good. We need that here.” The cab driver nodded his head in approval. “你看 (Nǐ kàn), Look, there’s trash everywhere.” I glanced out the window. We were heading north on Taoyuan’s major highway to ChungHua Plastic Industry Co., Ltd., a plastics manufacturer in the Cisco-Meraki electronics supply chain. My appointment…

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Endangered Vultures Critical to Disease Control in Africa

  National Geographic Society grantee Corinne Kendall studied vulture biology and conservation at Princeton and now works for North Carolina Zoo putting her knowledge to work in on-the-ground (and in-the-sky) research in Tanzania. She’s also passionate about education, managing a teacher training program in Uganda and teaching at zoos and universities across the United States….

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How engaging local communities helps a wildlife veterinarian save elephants

As amazing as it would be if they did, animals don’t help save animals. People do…or don’t. In Africa I have learned that working with communities alongside Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park has led to some interesting experiments involving “spicy beehive fences” — and perhaps more importantly, a changing perception that there are ways for local people to help resolve their conflict with wildlife….

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Just a Seagull? Nope

There’s no such thing as a seagull, according to certain pedants. How can that be?

Because it’s a gull—actually, one of about fifty gull species living in habitats all over the world, oceanic and otherwise. They range from the size of a dove to the size of an osprey, with all sorts of differences in appearance and behavior. Three of those species live here in New Zealand—including the river-dwelling black-billed gull, the most endangered gull in the world….

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James Clarke Welling: A Champion of Education in the Nation’s Capital

The thirty-three founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s recent 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. James Clarke Welling, a founder of the National Geographic Society,…

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A Gallant Gentleman, an Ideal Friend

The thirty-three founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s recent 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. In 1899, a 23 year-old Gilbert H. Grosvenor was finding…

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Frogs Through Time, Modern Portraits of Species Discovered Two Centuries Ago

Two hundred years ago a couple of young explorers set sail on what was to become one of the greatest scientific expeditions of all time. In 1817 Johann Baptist Ritter von Spix and Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius joined a naval excursion to Brazil and were given a humongous task—documenting the biodiversity and culture of that poorly known and largely exotic country. What they found during their three-year field trip would help lay the foundations of biodiversity research in South America. The importance of their scientific legacy is undeniable—hundreds of species discovered and detailed accounts on Brazilian indigenous cultures and habitats that have either vanished or been extensively altered through time….

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2017: A Landmark Year for Conservation Music

Dear friends and colleagues, Alex Paullin here, Founder of Conservation Music (“CM”) and National Geographic Explorer. It is with the utmost of gratitude and respect that I’m writing this letter today. It’s certainly a long time coming… the first month of 2018 has already nearly passed us by! Needless to say, it’s been a very busy…

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From One Extreme to Another as the Madidi Expedition Comes to a Close (Photos)

By Rob Wallace [Note: this is the eighth blog in a series of reports from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) on the Identidad Madidi expedition currently taking place in Bolivia’s Madidi National Park] In July, we were at the lowest point in Bolivia’s Madidi National Park—the Pampas de Heath. Since then the Identidad Madidi team has…

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

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Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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