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In collaboration with the National Geographic Society, the Kennedy Center will exhibit 100 powerful photographs taken by refugees and underserved youth who have participated in National Geographic Photo Camps over the past several years. Featuring photography from 10 countries including Mexico, Myanmar, Greece and Cuba, the exhibition will include a selection of photographs never before...

Many bird species worldwide have been able to adapt to changing environments and habitats, thriving close to human settlements, many other species however have not been able to adapt. Those unable to adapt are negatively affected by habitat loss and fragmentation, loss of food resources, and changing environmental conditions. Thank you to all the photographers...

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’re celebrating members of the National Geographic community who are expanding the field for more women, like Explorers Emily Toner and Jen Guyton. While they’re both Fulbright-National Geographic Storytelling Fellows, they each take a different approach to storytelling: Emily is a writer focused on land (specifically, soil), while Jen...

In the Northern Hemisphere spring is underway and migratory species will be returning to warmer climates to begin breeding in areas where there is more food available. Thank you to all the photographers that submitted photos of migratory birds, your pictures can create awareness about the variety of birds that migrate. Here we present the...

The National Geographic Society collaborated with the National Symphony Orchestra to co-commission a symphonic work that profoundly conveys the vulnerable state of the Arctic. Premiering on March 30, 2019 at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, ARCTICA will take listeners on an artistic voyage encouraging them to reflect on the wonders of...

In nature there are many types of interactions; mutualism where both organisms benefit, competition where both organisms may be negatively affected, commensalism where one benefits and the other is not affected, competition where each organism is affected negatively, and predation/parasitism/herbivory where one species benefits and the other is negatively affected. Thanks to all the photographers...

Written by Enric Sala, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, founder of Pristine Seas, and Director of the Last Wild Places Initiative For the last ten years, the National Geographic Pristine Seasteam has traveled the world to explore, document and protect the last wild places in the ocean. Together with our partners, we have inspired the protection of...

The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital (DCEFF), the largest environmental festival in the world and the longest running in the U.S., returns on March 14thand runs until March 24th. This year’s festival will present over 100 films at 25 different locations around Washington, DC, including museums, universities, embassies, libraries and theaters. National Geographic...

The list of students who have qualified for the 2019 National Geographic GeoBee State Competitions is now available here.Up to 100 fourth- to eighth-graders in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, U.S. Atlantic and Pacific territories and Department of Defense Dependents Schools will compete in the state competitions on March 29, 2019....

Birds as a group have great variety which makes for wonderful photographs. They are characterised by feathers, lightweight bones, and laying hard-shelled eggs. As a group they are very diverse appearing in varying shapes, sizes, and colours, and are distributed worldwide. Thanks to all the photographers that submitted bird photos, your pictures can create awareness...

A big thank you to everyone that participated in our photographic themes in 2018, we hope to see more of your photos, and new photographers throughout the coming year. All the best for birding in 2019. Thank you to all the photographers that submitted photos for the January theme, your pictures can create awareness about...

This year’s focus has been the Year of the Bird which marks 100 years since the passing of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, as part of this campaign we have had bird photo submissions from all over the world throughout the year, and shared as many interesting and diverse photos as we could. “Birds are...

Raptors are carnivorous birds that are physically and behaviourally adapted to hunt their particular prey which ranges from fish, to lizards and snakes, to small mammals and birds. The adaptations this group of birds use include hooked bills, excellent binocular vision, strong muscles, and sharp talons, all of which make killing their prey easier. Thanks...

It was the year when the Serengeti National Park’s music, or at least one section in its chorus-of-the-wild, died. In 1991, the twitters and whines of African wild dogs went strangely silent in Tanzania’s iconic protected area. Scientists began tracking wild dogs, also called painted wolves, here in 1964. Over the next quarter-century, researchers watched...