Amy Bucci

Illustration by Andrew Rae/Plastiki We are busy here at headquarters singing the new Plastiki song in celebration of her launch tomorrow from Sausalito, California, under San Francisco’s iconic Golden Gate Bridge. National Geographic Emerging Explorer David de Rothschild and the crew are ready for the adventure that will lead them across the Pacific Ocean to...

The 1924 Everest expedition. Back row, left to right: Andrew Irvine, George Mallory, Edward Norton, Noel Odell, and John Macdonald. Front row: Edward Shebbeare, Geoffrey Bruce, Howard Somervell, and Bentley Beetham. In 1999, Conrad Anker discovered the frozen body of George Mallory on Mount Everest. For years afterward, he wondered about Mallory’s quest for the...

Photograph by Jeronimo Hagerman National Geographic’s biggest fan here at Banff, Jim Olver, gave us a tour of the Banff Centre yesterday and introduced us to the Leighton Artists’ Colony, which Banff supports in addition to the Mountain Films. Photograph by Amy Bucci Jim Olver, Jill Sawyer and Jeronimo Hagerman look over Jeronimo’s latest photos....

You might never guess that the down-to-earth, easygoing Steve Winter has followed and photographed jaguars in Brazil, grizzly bears in Siberia, and tigers in Myanmar. (Though he does show an uncanny sense of direction here on the large Banff Centre campus.) Steve had the Banff festival audience laughing and gasping as he shared gorgeous photographs...

Photograph by Amy Bucci After about nine hours in the air and two more in a van—during which I was the only one who opted for the optional blanket—I have arrived in what I think is the most beautiful place on Earth: Banff, Canada. This town in the Canadian Rockies hosts the adrenaline-pumping, awe-inspiring, I-need-to-learn-to-snowboard-before-I-am-40...

The Royal Canadian Geographical Society awarded National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Wade Davis its top honor, the Gold Medal, at its 80th anniversary dinner in Ottawa last night. The anthropologist, ethnobotanist, writer, photographer, and lecturer is an eloquent and passionate voice for the world’s indigenous peoples and cultures. He has been described as the “real-life Indiana Jones.”...

Dereck and Beverly Joubert, National Geographic Explorers-in-Residence, have spent nearly three decades living alongside Africa’s lions and leopards. Working out of a tent or truck, they spend months at a time observing and learning about these top predators. With a collaborative storytelling style that weaves together Beverly’s photography and sound recordings with Dereck’s film footage...

I know, I know, I am not supposed to have favorites, but in the 2009 class of Emerging Explorers, I will say, I am particularly fond of the extremely talkative and fun T.H. Culhane. T.H. and his wife Sybille are passionate about energy and garbage. In fact, they are so committed to investigating new ways...

An illustration of Zinjanthropus by Peter V. Bianchi It was 50 years ago in Olduvai Gorge that Louis and Mary Leakey found fragments of teeth and a skull that were part of a male hominid they called Zinjanthropus, or Nutcracker Man, because of his huge teeth. This led to field research programs in Ethiopia and...

An example of biodegradable packaging from Ecovative. The 2009 Fellows from Pop!Tech–led by National Geographic Fellow Andrew Zolli–have been announced, and this year the group includes the amazing Eben Bayer of Ecovative Design. Eben and fellow RPI graduate Gavin McIntyre were fascinated by mushrooms growing on wood chips and observed how the fungi strongly bonded...

It’s 4 a.m. in the Nicaraguan frontier town of El Ayote. The kitchen chimney smoke and exhaust fumes combine with the dangling lights to give the main street an eerie vibe. Rumbling buses packed to the roof start their journey southwest to cross the mountains that mark the Nicaraguan watershed. Archaeologist and National Geographic Society/Waitt...

National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Mike Fay’s Redwood Transect is featured on the cover of this month’s magazine. The buzz here is all about the redwoods, Mike’s amazing walk and the huge, cool, special foldout image of a redwood tree in the middle of the magazine. Photograph by Lindsey Holm I met with Mike and Lindsey Holm...

National Geographic staffer Fabio Amador shared some news about one of our National Geographic Society/Waitt grantees, Rogelio Acevedo, a geologist from the Centro Austral de Investiggaciones Cientificas in Argentina. In a remote region of Patagonia, enormous craters measuring up to 500 meters wide and 50 meters in depth could be evidence to a bombardment of...

I hate war. That’s why I’m drawn to it. I’m waging a war against war. – Reza Self-described nomad, photographer, and National Geographic fellow Reza Deghati was in D.C. to give a National Geographic Live! talk at headquarters. In his new book, War and Peace: A Photographer’s Journey, Reza details his decades-long odyssey since exile...

We were checking out the guide for Crown of the Continent, a region spanning the U.S.-Canada border and surrounding Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park in southwestern Alberta, southeastern British Columbia, and northwestern Montana. The site’s a compendium of the best parks and wilderness areas, hiking and skiing trails, restaurants, lodges, festivals, and more, with native perspectives...