biodiversity

Mapping the Critical Role of Indigenous Peoples in Global Conservation

By Stephen Garnett and James Watson Hazda, Aranda, Orang Asli, Yanomami and Cherokee – Indigenous Peoples have many names around the world. With such diversity in names and cultures, some people might not be aware of the many things that Indigenous Peoples share. One is deep cultural attachment to their land and sea – an…

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Historical Sign of Chesapeake Winter, the Canvasback, Still Brightens the Bay

“They came back,” says biologist Donald Webster. “This year.” His voice has a wistful note, wondering if the king of ducks, as the beautiful, crimson-headed canvasback is known, will return to rule Chesapeake Bay again next winter. In parka, gloves and hat, Webster, waterfowl coordinator for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR), raises his…

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The Revival of Zakouma National Park’s Elephant Population: Interview with Rian Labuschagne

Zakouma National Park in Chad is one the last remaining intact Sudano-Sahelian ecosystems in Africa. During the mid-2000s, Chad experienced civil unrest and conflict with Sudan; rampant poaching had decimated Zakouma’s elephant population, which had once roamed free in herds of a thousand strong.  Seeking refuge from fighting, elephants would herd in Zakouma park, where…

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Tracking Black Rhino on Foot in Community-Owned Sera Rhino Sanctuary, Northern Kenya

A wind was blowing from the west, sending dust devils spinning across northern Kenya’s plains as our guide, Sammy Lemiruni, explained how to track black rhino on foot. We were in Samburu-land en route to Sera Rhino Sanctuary, which became the first sanctuary in East Africa to offer a pioneering rhino-tracking safaris to tourists in…

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Celebrating Sulawesi: An Exuberance of Indonesian Biodiversity

By Matthew Linkie Indonesia is a megadiversity country, but even by its exceptionally high levels of biodiversity, Sulawesi stands out for its bewilderingly rich, charismatic and, at times, quirky species. The island, whose shape resembles a hyper-extended letter K, is the 11th largest in the world. Sulawesi’s shape and rugged terrain were forged by the…

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Sailing a 108-Year-Old Ship Through the Most Biologically-Diverse Marine Ecosystem on the Planet

  This winter (in the northern hemisphere), the Biosphere Foundation is undertaking a sea voyage on their 108-year-old ship through the gumdrop islands and turquoise waters of Raja Ampat — the most biologically-diverse marine ecosystem on the planet. A Homecoming I hadn’t seen her in over seven years, then there she was, resting peacefully on a…

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Wolf – Caribou Detente? Clues Hidden on Lake Superior Islands

A woodland caribou peers through spruce trees on Lake Superior’s Slate Islands. (Photograph: Andrew Silver) Qalipu, it’s called by Canada’s Mi’kmaq people. To others, it’s the elusive gray ghost of the far northern forest. Most know it simply as caribou. Woodland caribou are medium-sized members of the deer family. In Canadian provinces such as Ontario,…

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19 New Species of Speedy Praying Mantises Found

A scientist has discovered 19 new species of super-speedy praying mantises that roam Central and South America, a new study says. The insects belong to a group called bark mantises, which are flatter and broader than the more commonly known mantis. “They almost look like cockroaches with a narrow front end,” said Gavin Svenson, curator of invertebrate…

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European Union Fisheries Ban Ignores Belize Conservation Success Story

By Britt Groosman and Janet Gibson Belize is a small nation that has been making some big headlines lately due to the rogue fishing practices of some of the vessels its government has flagged. Unfortunately, this makes it look like the 15,000 Belizeans whose livelihoods are directly tied to fishing are all bad actors and…

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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