birds

As part of a year of activities to support birds and their habitats, National Geographic, BirdLife International, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and the National Audubon Society are convening an event featuring two expert panels to explore how technology is expanding our understanding of migration and how creative new solutions are advancing conservation and policy. Watch a live stream of the discussions here:...

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer   On a late January afternoon the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge trails are quiet,...

This year I am celebrating World Wetlands Day in Luanda, Angola where we have just launched the new Portuguese issue of the National Geographic magazine, featuring an article documenting our journey to the source of one of Africa’s most important wetland systems- the Okavango-Zambezi Basin. There is a new energy in the city, with a...

Wild Bird Trust presents this week’s Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs Against Spectacular Landscapes. We were truly blown away by the amazing landscape and habitat shots that were submitted this week!  Birds are excellent indicators of habitat quality, when habitats are degraded only the generalist and opportunistic species will remain in the area, others will...

A remote, protected beach on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi is a critical nesting area for “strange” birds called maleos and olive ridley sea turtles, reports the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in New York. On February 23 on Sulawesi’s Binerean Cape, conservationists with WCS and local partner PALS (Pelestari Alam Liar dan Satwa, or Wildlife and...

St. Patrick’s Day is almost here, a holiday famous for parades, parties, and everything turning so green that it’s like looking at the world through night-vision goggles. But when we think “green” we sometimes think “eco,” so in honor of Green Day here are five of nature’s “greenest” animals, not in color but in habit....

Welcome back to Ask Your Weird Animal Questions, where we answer your wildest questions about anything animal.  Today’s post is all avian, starting with one bird’s topsy-turvy table manners. Why Does a Flamingo Eat Upside Down? Brittney from the U.S. sent in this question about the flamingo dining experience, which, it turns out, actually starts with...

Every year at BioBlitz, National Geographic and the U.S. National Park Service rally to get people young and old to explore the wild spaces around them during a whirlwind 24-hour search to identify every species they can find. In advance of our next event in Golden Gate National Recreation Area, March 28-29, 2014, we’re already...

For one species of bird, a stare a day keeps its enemies at bay. New research shows that the Eurasian jackdaw (Corvus monedula), a medium-size, dark-feathered bird in the crow family, scares off competitor jackdaws with a withering look. (Related: “Bird With ‘Human’ Eyes Knows What You’re Looking At.”) Scientists have long known that directed...

While parts of the U.S. bundle up for extreme winter weather, the animals on American Prairie Reserve (APR) have enjoyed several warm weeks in January. Since my last trip to the Reserve earlier this month, our staff and volunteer adventure scientists have spotted bison, mule deer, and large groups of pronghorn moving with ease across the...

The savannah monitor lizard (Varanus exanthematicus) doesn’t eat like a bird, but it does breathe like one, a new study has discovered. Air flows only one way through its lungs—other than the American alligator, it’s the only other known reptile found to have this trait. That’s surprising, because the unidirectional airflow of birds was thought to have...

Shopkeepers in any downtown area love foot traffic, right? It’s the key to business. But what if that traffic isn’t full of potential shoppers. What if, instead, it’s a flock of large birds strutting their stuff down the sidewalks? That’s the scene these days in Longreach, Queensland; an influx of emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae) is starting...

Forget circumnavigating the globe in 80 days—an albatross can do it in a mere 46! These world travelers are among the largest flying birds, weighing up to 25 pounds (11 kilograms), and with a wingspan of 11 feet (3 meters). But hefting such huge bodies off the ground takes a lot of energy. If albatrosses...

Birds do it. Bees do it. Butterflies and chimpanzees do it.  These animals and many others self-medicate, using plants and other surprising materials to improve not only their own health but also the health of their offspring. A video of capuchin monkeys at the Edinburgh Zoo shows them rubbing onions and limes on their skin and into...