climate change

Conservation Takes One Scientist to the Extreme

By Marlene Cimons Conservationist Joel Berger lives in the extreme. That’s the best word to describe his travels, and what he does. He goes to extreme environments — not any of the usual tourist destinations — to study how animals there adapt. These places are hot and cold deserts, for example, the uppermost regions of the tallest of mountains, and the…

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Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas and Climate Change in Canada’s Boreal Forest

By Cheryl Chetkiewicz [Note: this is the third and final blog in this WCS series during the Global Climate Action Summit, taking place in San Francisco this week, examining the role of Indigenous Peoples in protecting forest resources and mitigating climate change.] At 5.6 million square kilometres, Canada’s boreal region is one of the largest forests…

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Protect Indigenous Rights and Culture to Confront the Climate Crisis

By Lilian Painter [Note: this is the second in a 3-part series during the Global Climate Action Summit, taking place in San Francisco this week, examining the role of Indigenous Peoples in protecting forest resources and mitigating climate change.] This week in San Francisco, government and business leaders, investors, and average citizens are gathering to inspire…

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Securing Intact Forests and Indigenous Livelihoods in DR Congo

By Deo Kujirakwinja and Michael Painter [Note: this is the first in a 3-part series during the Global Climate Action Summit, taking place in San Francisco this week, examining the role of Indigenous Peoples in protecting forest resources and mitigating climate change.] In eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the Batwa people have played a…

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Stirrings in the Muck: Fiddler Crabs, Yellow-Crowned Night Herons Locked in Climate Change Dance

Thalia, it’s called, this upscale neighborhood in Virginia Beach that’s lined with red brick ranches shaded by tall loblolly pines. The community is a few short miles from the mouth of Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean beyond. Bounded on the west by Thalia Creek and on the north by the eastern branch of the…

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Stunning underwater photography project sheds light on our acidifying oceans

By Safina Center Staff Last week an international team of marine scientists published a paper in Scientific Reports that heeds a strong warning to the world: Carbon dioxide emissions from human activities are heating up the oceans and making them more acidic, killing coral reefs, kelp forests and countless marine animals. Digging deeper into their…

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Fish Are Losing Their Sense of Smell

By Marlene Cimons There have been numerous wake-up calls about the effects of climate change on marine life. As ocean waters heat up, they are bleaching corals. Growing levels of carbon dioxide are acidifying seawater, which is degrading the shells and skeletons of sea organisms. The rising temperatures are prompting fish to migrate to colder waters, even causing them…

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Caught In a Race Against Climate Change, Lizards Hit an Evolutionary Dead End

By Marlene Cimons Brown anoles are one of the most successful species on the planet. These resilient creatures have settled throughout a large portion of the Western Hemisphere, even landing in such distant places as Hawaii and Singapore by hitching rides across the Pacific in shipments of ornamental plants. In the southeastern United States, they…

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Un Enfoque Divertido para los Educadores para Involucrar a los Estudiantes en Biodiversidad de Insectos & Cambio Climático

Los insectos generalmente no son muy atractivos a los ojos de muchos, fuera de las coloridas y “carismáticas” mariposas y escarabajos. ¿Cómo mostrar a las moscas y “gusanos” de una manera interesante y atractiva? El secreto está en exponer las vidas secretas de los insectos. ¿Sabías que puedes usar “gusanos” para ver si el agua del río es buena…

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About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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