conservation

This land is your land, this land is my land: Can we coexist with wolves and kin?

For the first time in history, the majority of humans lives in urbanized areas; more than three billion people reside in cities and suburbs around the world. As we’re moving into town, wild canids — wolves and coyotes, foxes and jackals — are right behind us. Or we’re behind them, sometimes claiming turf they’d already…

Read More

Conservation Takes One Scientist to the Extreme

By Marlene Cimons Conservationist Joel Berger lives in the extreme. That’s the best word to describe his travels, and what he does. He goes to extreme environments — not any of the usual tourist destinations — to study how animals there adapt. These places are hot and cold deserts, for example, the uppermost regions of the tallest of mountains, and the…

Read More

Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas and Climate Change in Canada’s Boreal Forest

By Cheryl Chetkiewicz [Note: this is the third and final blog in this WCS series during the Global Climate Action Summit, taking place in San Francisco this week, examining the role of Indigenous Peoples in protecting forest resources and mitigating climate change.] At 5.6 million square kilometres, Canada’s boreal region is one of the largest forests…

Read More

Protect Indigenous Rights and Culture to Confront the Climate Crisis

By Lilian Painter [Note: this is the second in a 3-part series during the Global Climate Action Summit, taking place in San Francisco this week, examining the role of Indigenous Peoples in protecting forest resources and mitigating climate change.] This week in San Francisco, government and business leaders, investors, and average citizens are gathering to inspire…

Read More

Securing Intact Forests and Indigenous Livelihoods in DR Congo

By Deo Kujirakwinja and Michael Painter [Note: this is the first in a 3-part series during the Global Climate Action Summit, taking place in San Francisco this week, examining the role of Indigenous Peoples in protecting forest resources and mitigating climate change.] In eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the Batwa people have played a…

Read More

Fishing nets are taking whales’ food in the shadow of Manhattan. Here’s what you need to know

By Safina Center Staff One commercial fishing company is cruising off the shores of New York, taking whales’ food. One year ago we reported that small, herring-like fish called menhaden, a major food source for whales, dolphins and large fishes, were making a comeback in New York waters. But then, last year, fisheries managers decided…

Read More

Top 25 Grassland Birds

Grasslands are the world’s most altered ecosystem, frequently being converted for cropping, pastures or urbanisation. When grasslands are transformed by humans, this often pushes out sensitive grassland birds, for example the Great Indian Bustard, now listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. Fortunately some grassland birds, like the Eastern Meadowlark, are adaptive and…

Read More

The Dwindling Sharks and Rays of the Western Indian Ocean

By Rhett Bennett Sharks have been cruising the world’s oceans for millions of years. We know them as ferocious hunters, built for the kill. And some are. However, most shark and ray species have somewhat less aggressive feeding behaviour and, of course, many end up as food themselves. These magnificent creatures have adapted to an…

Read More

About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

Social Media