Historical Sign of Chesapeake Winter, the Canvasback, Still Brightens the Bay

“They came back,” says biologist Donald Webster. “This year.” His voice has a wistful note, wondering if the king of ducks, as the beautiful, crimson-headed canvasback is known, will return to rule Chesapeake Bay again next winter. In parka, gloves and hat, Webster, waterfowl coordinator for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR), raises his…

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The Revival of Zakouma National Park’s Elephant Population: Interview with Rian Labuschagne

Zakouma National Park in Chad is one the last remaining intact Sudano-Sahelian ecosystems in Africa. During the mid-2000s, Chad experienced civil unrest and conflict with Sudan; rampant poaching had decimated Zakouma’s elephant population, which had once roamed free in herds of a thousand strong.  Seeking refuge from fighting, elephants would herd in Zakouma park, where…

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Top 25 Wild Raptors

Wild Bird Trust presents the Top 25 Wild Raptors. Raptors are some of the most awe-inspiring birds. They are strong and agile with excellent eyesight, making them highly adept hunters. This week we feature raptors from all over the globe, from the tiny Falconet of south-east Asia to the mighty Martial Eagle of Africa. The…

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Tracking Black Rhino on Foot in Community-Owned Sera Rhino Sanctuary, Northern Kenya

A wind was blowing from the west, sending dust devils spinning across northern Kenya’s plains as our guide, Sammy Lemiruni, explained how to track black rhino on foot. We were in Samburu-land en route to Sera Rhino Sanctuary, which became the first sanctuary in East Africa to offer a pioneering rhino-tracking safaris to tourists in…

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Friends, and Heroes, of Mansuar

The Biosphere Foundation’s crew aboard S/V Mir recently spent ten days working on reef restoration and education projects on the island of Mansuar in Raja Ampat. While there, we were reunited with some very special people. You might even call them heroes.   Sutama Pak Ketut Sutama is a self-motivated, grassroots, ocean conservationist, which in…

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Addressing Cumulative Impacts of Climate Change and Development on Freshwater Fish in Northern Ontario

By Cheryl Chetkiewicz Ontario is a Canadian province built on mining and mineral exploration. Over the past two decades, the provincial government has encouraged and facilitated new mines in Ontario’s Far North—a large, remote and largely roadless region that is the homeland for nearly 40,000 First Nations. The “Ring of Fire” mineral belt, located approximately…

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Conservation Accomplishment, Travel Adventure

Mexico’s Hidden Garden, the Sierra Gorda You can sum up the key to this Mexican conservation success in one word: “Inclusion.” So says the cofounder of Grupo Ecológico Sierra Gorda, the Sierra Gorda Ecological Group. That’s Pati, or more formally, Martha Ruiz Corzo, the charismatic changemaker who has spent much of her life working to…

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WCS Bangladesh Marine Megafauna Survey: Day Two with a New Discovery from F.B. Jobeda

By Shanta Shamsunnahar [Note: This is the third blog in a series about the WCS-led marine megafauna survey, which is gathering data on whales, sea turtles, sharks, and other marine species inhabiting the coastal waters of Bangladesh. Data from the effort will identify biologically important locations for future consideration as marine protected areas.] The WCS marine megafauna…

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Another Kind of Migration: A Visit to Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve

There has been plenty of news coverage lately about the state of foreign relations between Mexico and the United States. But there is one issue — or rather, species — that is continuing to bring the countries together: monarch butterflies. This week, I’m taking a break from my regular focus on refugee narratives, policy, and…

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World Wetlands Day salute: Okavango Delta and NatGeo’s Okavango Wilderness Project

In observance of World Wetlands Day, National Geographic salutes the heroic work of the Okavango Wilderness Project, working to preserve the largest freshwater wetland in Southern Africa — and the main source of water for a million people.  Spanning southern Angola, Namibia, and northern Botswana, the Okavango Basin is one of Africa’s richest places for biodiversity,…

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