conservation

Addressing Cumulative Impacts of Climate Change and Development on Freshwater Fish in Northern Ontario

By Cheryl Chetkiewicz Ontario is a Canadian province built on mining and mineral exploration. Over the past two decades, the provincial government has encouraged and facilitated new mines in Ontario’s Far North—a large, remote and largely roadless region that is the homeland for nearly 40,000 First Nations. The “Ring of Fire” mineral belt, located approximately…

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Conservation Accomplishment, Travel Adventure

Mexico’s Hidden Garden, the Sierra Gorda You can sum up the key to this Mexican conservation success in one word: “Inclusion.” So says the cofounder of Grupo Ecológico Sierra Gorda, the Sierra Gorda Ecological Group. That’s Pati, or more formally, Martha Ruiz Corzo, the charismatic changemaker who has spent much of her life working to…

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WCS Bangladesh Marine Megafauna Survey: Day Two with a New Discovery from F.B. Jobeda

By Shanta Shamsunnahar [Note: This is the third blog in a series about the WCS-led marine megafauna survey, which is gathering data on whales, sea turtles, sharks, and other marine species inhabiting the coastal waters of Bangladesh. Data from the effort will identify biologically important locations for future consideration as marine protected areas.] The WCS marine megafauna…

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Another Kind of Migration: A Visit to Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve

There has been plenty of news coverage lately about the state of foreign relations between Mexico and the United States. But there is one issue — or rather, species — that is continuing to bring the countries together: monarch butterflies. This week, I’m taking a break from my regular focus on refugee narratives, policy, and…

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World Wetlands Day salute: Okavango Delta and NatGeo’s Okavango Wilderness Project

In observance of World Wetlands Day, National Geographic salutes the heroic work of the Okavango Wilderness Project, working to preserve the largest freshwater wetland in Southern Africa — and the main source of water for a million people.  Spanning southern Angola, Namibia, and northern Botswana, the Okavango Basin is one of Africa’s richest places for biodiversity,…

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An Update Direct From the Okavango, for World Wetlands Day.

This year I am celebrating World Wetlands Day in Luanda, Angola where we have just launched the new Portuguese issue of the National Geographic magazine, featuring an article documenting our journey to the source of one of Africa’s most important wetland systems- the Okavango-Zambezi Basin. There is a new energy in the city, with a…

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Endangered Vultures Critical to Disease Control in Africa

  National Geographic Society grantee Corinne Kendall studied vulture biology and conservation at Princeton and now works for North Carolina Zoo putting her knowledge to work in on-the-ground (and in-the-sky) research in Tanzania. She’s also passionate about education, managing a teacher training program in Uganda and teaching at zoos and universities across the United States….

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Gilbert Thompson, Lying Bob, and the Ballad of Croppy the Mule

The thirty-three founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s recent 130th anniversary, this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins The story, as he liked to tell…

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Almon Thompson: The Self-Taught Cartographer Who Helped Found National Geographic

The thirty-three founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s recent 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins Almon Thompson didn’t set out to…

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How America’s Leading Hydrographer Helped Found The National Geographic Society

The thirty-three founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group.  They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo.  In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s recent 130th anniversary, this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins Despite appearances—he “continued to dress in the…

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Central America’s Wildlife Through the Eyes of Its People… and Their Cell Phones

By Jeremy Radachowsky As a child, I spent hours poring through pictures of wildlife in books and magazines. My most treasured possession was a field guide to reptiles and amphibians, its page corners deeply worn from my thumbs. It was the first real book I ever read cover to cover (multiple times, at that!) but…

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Henry Henshaw: The National Geographic Founder Who Helped Save America’s Birds

The thirty-three founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group.  They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo.  In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s recent 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins On August 27, 1870, a young,…

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Traveling the World to Study Its Waters

The 33 founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s upcoming 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins For being related to such a…

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About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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