conservation

Can We Protect the Last Intact Forests of the World in the 21st Century?

We are now at a point in the course of human history where there are only a handful of places on Earth that are not severely altered by the footprint of large-scale industrial activities. Those within parts of the Earth where trees are dominant are termed “intact” or “primary” forests. A few weeks ago I…

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Mapping the Critical Role of Indigenous Peoples in Global Conservation

By Stephen Garnett and James Watson Hazda, Aranda, Orang Asli, Yanomami and Cherokee – Indigenous Peoples have many names around the world. With such diversity in names and cultures, some people might not be aware of the many things that Indigenous Peoples share. One is deep cultural attachment to their land and sea – an…

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The Inspiring Way Adventures in the Field Are Driving Innovations in the Lab

By Andrew Howley of Adventure Scientists This year at the Aspen Ideas Festival: Spotlight Health, just a few days after joining his fellow Nat Geo Explorers at the 2018 Explorers Festival, our founder, Gregg Treinish, had the opportunity to speak via Facebook Live about what our organization is doing to connect scientists in need of…

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Indigenous leaders of Pimachiowin Aki Are a Beacon of Hope As World Heritage Designation Becomes Official

The Bloodvein River, one of many significant rivers, streams and water bodies within Pimachiowin Aki. Photo Jeff Wells. It’s part of what may be the largest single block of intact forest in the largest intact forest landscape left in human history and the largest remaining landscape of southern boreal forest left in Canada. Millions of…

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To native birds’ benefit, conservationists declare South Georgia clear of invasive rodents for first time in more than 200 years

Celebrated sea captain James Cook implanted a British flag down into the rocky, icy ground on the shore of South Georgia in 1775. When he did so, he claimed ownership of the icy, mountainous Antarctic island not only for his country’s humans, but, inadvertently, also for its rodents. From the arrival of Cook onward, ships…

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Un Enfoque Divertido para los Educadores para Involucrar a los Estudiantes en Biodiversidad de Insectos & Cambio Climático

Los insectos generalmente no son muy atractivos a los ojos de muchos, fuera de las coloridas y “carismáticas” mariposas y escarabajos. ¿Cómo mostrar a las moscas y “gusanos” de una manera interesante y atractiva? El secreto está en exponer las vidas secretas de los insectos. ¿Sabías que puedes usar “gusanos” para ver si el agua del río es buena…

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A Fun Approach for Educators to Engage Students in Insect Biodiversity & Climate Change

  Insects are not generally appealing to most, outside the “charismatic” colorful butterflies and beetles. How can flies and “maggots” be presented in an interesting and appealing way? The secret lies in exposing the insects’ secret lives. Did you know that you can use “maggots” to see if the water from a stream is good to…

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Opinion: Poisoning of Ugandan Lions Highlights Africa’s Rural Poverty Crisis

No wild animal on earth has an easy death. Be it starvation, disease, mortal wound, or a predator’s teeth, an inevitably grisly end awaits all creatures born into a world where nature’s dictum is the daily struggle to survive. Though seemingly cruel, the ebb and flow of an animal’s precarious existence is the status quo…

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Secrets of Our Ocean Planet: Saving Sponges to Keep Marine Ecosystems Healthy

  By Rachel Downey (Australia National University & British Antarctic Survey) and Claire Christian (ASOC) Sponges may historically be one of world’s greatest survivors, but on our planet, we have a number of new human-made challenges that sponges have not come up against before. The deployment of fishing gear that smash seabed habitats, the laying…

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Secrets of Our Ocean Planet: Sponges as Civil Engineers and Pharmacists

By Rachel Downey (Australia National University & British Antarctic Survey) and Claire Christian (ASOC) In our last post, we introduced you to one of nature’s underappreciated animals, the sea sponge. Sponges have been around for over 600 million years, by developing some fascinating adaptations that make them one of our greatest global survivors. Long existence…

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About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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