fisheries

The Dwindling Sharks and Rays of the Western Indian Ocean

By Rhett Bennett Sharks have been cruising the world’s oceans for millions of years. We know them as ferocious hunters, built for the kill. And some are. However, most shark and ray species have somewhat less aggressive feeding behaviour and, of course, many end up as food themselves. These magnificent creatures have adapted to an…

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Reducing Manta Ray Mortality in the World’s Largest Targeted Manta Fishery

By Hollie Booth This Shark Week, take a moment to consider the manta ray. This much-loved gentle giant of the shark and ray (elasmobranch) family is a large, slow-growing and long-lived species, which makes it particularly vulnerable to overfishing. Unfortunately, fishers have increasingly targeted mantas in recent decades to meet emerging demand for their gills…

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Congress working to take fisheries backward 20 years

By Safina Center Staff It took the United States decades to develop and perfect an effective fisheries management plan that helps keep enough fish to feed both the nation’s people and its animals. The landmark legislation that turned around the country’s widespread overfishing problem was called the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, passed in…

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European Union Fisheries Ban Ignores Belize Conservation Success Story

By Britt Groosman and Janet Gibson Belize is a small nation that has been making some big headlines lately due to the rogue fishing practices of some of the vessels its government has flagged. Unfortunately, this makes it look like the 15,000 Belizeans whose livelihoods are directly tied to fishing are all bad actors and…

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Tackling Overfishing on Many Fronts

As the World Ocean Summit winds down in Half Moon Bay, California, this evening, much discussion among the hundreds of gathered delegates has turned to overfishing.  There were perhaps as many thoughts on the subject as members in attendance from the fishing industry, academia, conservation organizations, and the media. But, several solutions emerged that received…

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Can World Leaders Tame the Wild West of the High Seas?

Earlier this month, Indonesia announced the world’s largest sanctuary for manta rays. At the World Ocean Summit Tuesday, Peter Seligmann, the CEO of Conservation International, said the sanctuary “was not done out of good will, it was done out of enlightened self interest.” Seligmann said Indonesia had made careful calculations about how much manta rays…

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Conflict Coast: Mozambique’s Primeiras E Segundas Archipelago

Photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan Originally commissioned by WWF Words by Cara Jessop. Empty-handed, fisherman Fome Ali Buri gestures out to sea with the words “It’s over. The ocean is finished. When we fish, all we catch is sand.” Outwardly, Mozambique is a booming and prosperous country, one of the world’s fastest growing economies…

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Photographing the End of the Kreef

Text and photographs by International League of Conservation Photographers Fellow Cheryl-Samantha Owen www.samowenphotography.com “It is currently estimated that numbers of rock lobster on the West Coast of South Africa are perilously low, at only three percent of their original pre-exploitation or pristine levels.” At 4:35 in the morning the faint glow of dawn backlit the…

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Protecting Coral Reefs, From the FL Keys to the Savu Sea

By Rob Brumbaugh, Integrated Ocean Management Lead, The Nature Conservancy I’ve just returned from Bali, Indonesia, where I spent three weeks working with The Nature Conservancy’s Indonesia marine program, and attending an international conference of scientists and economists exploring ways to make the human benefits of nature more apparent to policy makers and stakeholders everywhere. …

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MPAs for Fish Fillets in the Coral Triangle (2)

A recent Asia Development Bank report estimates that some 4.9 million people work as fishers across a selection of the Asia Pacific region (the Coral Triangle countries: Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands, and Timor L’Este). Between 2007 and 2009, seafood constituted approximately 20 percent of the animal protein consumed in Coral Triangle…

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Innovating the Business of Seafood for Communities & Health

By Amanda Nagai Certifications and barcode trackers can help shoppers identify seafood at the fish counter, but for consumers who really want to know what they’re eating, the real key may be genuine relationships with the people who hauled in the catch. From Alaska to San Francisco to Boston, conservationist Native Americans, seafood entrepreneurs, and nonprofit…

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Fukushima Fallout Not Affecting U.S.-Caught Fish

This article was originally published by the Center for American Progress. In recent weeks, there has been a significant uptick in news from Fukushima, Japan. Officials from the Japanese government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, admitted that radioactive water is still leaking from the nuclear plant crippled by the 2011 earthquake and…

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

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