Karl Gruber

Forget Miley Cyrus: When it comes to twerking, spiders can save their lives by shaking their booties, a new study says. Scientists have found that male black widows move their bodies in a certain way to let females know of their presence—and avoid becoming their next meal. (Also see “Surprise! Male Spiders Eat Females, Too.”)...

Forget Miley Cyrus: When it comes to twerking, spiders can save their lives by shaking their booties, a new study says. Scientists have found that male black widows move their bodies in a certain way to let females know of their presence—and avoid becoming their next meal. (Also see “Surprise! Male Spiders Eat Females, Too.”)...

By Karl Gruber They don’t exactly say achoo, but sponges can “sneeze,” according to a new study that shows the simple aquatic creatures are more complex than previously thought.  Sponges are stationary animals, found in both marine and fresh water, that lack nervous and digestive systems. The porous invertebrates have a central cavity called an...

By Karl Gruber They don’t exactly say achoo, but sponges can “sneeze,” according to a new study that shows the simple aquatic creatures are more complex than previously thought.  Sponges are stationary animals, found in both marine and fresh water, that lack nervous and digestive systems. The porous invertebrates have a central cavity called an...

Dogs don’t need a compass: Your best friend can sense Earth’s magnetic field, say researchers who report that dogs preferentially align themselves facing north or south to do their business. Dogs are well known for their excellent sense of smell and their keen sense of hearing. The team, led by zoologist Hynek Burda of Germany’s University...

By Karl Gruber Strawberry poison frogs (Oophaga pumilio) of Costa Rica give their newborn tadpoles a built-in weapon against predators: alkaloids. Various animals and plants use alkaloids—naturally occurring, bitter-tasting chemical compounds—as a first line of defense. For instance, adult strawberry poison frogs get the chemicals from their diets of ants and mites, “which essentially makes the...

By Karl Gruber Strawberry poison frogs (Oophaga pumilio) of Costa Rica give their newborn tadpoles a built-in weapon against predators: alkaloids. Various animals and plants use alkaloids—naturally occurring, bitter-tasting chemical compounds—as a first line of defense. For instance, adult strawberry poison frogs get the chemicals from their diets of ants and mites, “which essentially makes the...