Kate Horowitz

By Kate Horowitz The bald eagle. The Lincoln Memorial. The Stars and Stripes. Symbols matter in the United States. But regional pride is important, too, and every state in the union has its own heritage to celebrate—sometimes in odd ways. As children, we all learned about our state flags and state birds—but who can name...

By Kate Horowitz The bald eagle. The Lincoln Memorial. The Stars and Stripes. Symbols matter in the United States. But regional pride is important, too, and every state in the union has its own heritage to celebrate—sometimes in odd ways. As children, we all learned about our state flags and state birds—but who can name...

By Kate Horowitz Birds do it. Bees do it. But genetically modified fruit flies just aren’t in the mood. In what could be called the chemical equivalent of a cold shower, an international team of entomologists has discovered how to decrease some pest insects’ interest in sex. (Related: “Female Flies Put Up a Fight to Keep Sex Short.”)...

By Kate Horowitz Birds do it. Bees do it. But genetically modified fruit flies just aren’t in the mood. In what could be called the chemical equivalent of a cold shower, an international team of entomologists has discovered how to decrease some pest insects’ interest in sex. (Related: “Female Flies Put Up a Fight to Keep Sex Short.”)...

By Kate Horowitz Birds do it. Bees do it. But genetically modified fruit flies just aren’t in the mood. In what could be called the chemical equivalent of a cold shower, an international team of entomologists has discovered how to decrease some pest insects’ interest in sex. (Related: “Female Flies Put Up a Fight to Keep Sex Short.”)...

By Kate Horowitz At the first whiff of a mountain lion, a mouse might scamper away, a rabbit might freeze, and a stray dog might prepare for a fight. These instinctive responses, so crucial to survival, are surprisingly common: New research shows that even plants can benefit from “eavesdropping” on chemical cues from their attackers....

By Kate Horowitz At the first whiff of a mountain lion, a mouse might scamper away, a rabbit might freeze, and a stray dog might prepare for a fight. These instinctive responses, so crucial to survival, are surprisingly common: New research shows that even plants can benefit from “eavesdropping” on chemical cues from their attackers....