Miguel Vilar

Join us at National Geographic in wishing every past, current, and future Genographic Project participant a Happy DNA Day! Sixty-three years ago today a ground-breaking paper was published that introduced us to the double helix and revealed the structure of DNA, catapulting forward the field of genetics. The scientific world never looked back. Eleven years…

Changing Planet

‘The Dominican Republic has it all.’  That phrase is not just the slogan that tourists see when visiting the beautiful Caribbean nation, but it is also what a team of geneticists and anthropologists are hoping to show as they embark on a one-of-a-kind study across the eastern half of the island of Hispañola. Drs. Theodore…

Changing Planet

    Ten years ago, National Geographic and IBM teamed up with a group of international scientists and indigenous community members at National Geographic Society’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. to kick off the Genographic Project. Our plan: To use advanced DNA analyses to answer fundamental scientific questions, such as where we originated from, and how…

Changing Planet

By Anika Rice, Explorer Programs Northeastern Madagascar’s incredibly diverse forests are home to rich local medicinal traditions. The Makira forest area in particular houses some 250 plant species that are used to treat more than 80 illnesses. Some experts estimate that the Makira watershed houses 50 percent of Malagasy floral biodiversity. Locals harvest and prepare these…

Changing Planet

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How far will Genographic Project scientists go to help reveal where we came from? Geographically-speaking the answer may be Puerto Williams, the southern tip of Chile where jagged snow-covered mountains meet the blue sea creating a drastic and unforgettable landscape. Genographic Project grantee Dr. Marta Alfonso-Durruty has immersed herself in this corner of South America to analyze dozens…

Changing Planet

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