Neil Hammerschlag

How & Why Consuming Shark Fins & Meat Can Put both Humans and Sharks at Risk

I have previously blogged about the how the demand for shark fin soup poses a large threat to shark populations. However, newly published research has found high concentrations of toxins linked to human neurodegenerative diseases in the fins and muscles of 10 species of sharks. In the study, fins and muscle tissue samples were collected…

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New Study Showed Spawning Frequency Regulates Species Population Networks on Coral Reefs

New research on tropical coral reef ecosystems showed that releasing larvae more often is beneficial for a species’ network. The study on reproductive strategies is critical to assess the conservation of coral reef ecosystems worldwide. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science used a computer model developed by…

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Study of ‘Senior Citizen’ Marine Snails Uncovered How Nerve Cells Fail During Learning

A new research study on marine snails uncovered the first cells in the nervous system to fail during aging. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers’ findings are important to better understanding the underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss in humans. Scientists performed tail reflex experiments on the hatchery-reared…

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New Tool To Monitor Harmful Bacteria at Beaches

An international team, led by researchers has developed a new, timelier method to identify harmful bacteria levels on recreational beaches. The new model provides beach managers with a better prediction tool to identify when closures are required to protect beachgoers from harmful contaminates in the water. “The development of this new model has allowed us,…

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Threatened Corals Swap “Algae” Partners to Survive Warming Oceans

A new research study showed why threatened Caribbean star corals sometimes swap partners to help them recover from bleaching events. The findings are important to understand the fate of coral reefs as ocean waters warm due to climate change. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science research team placed colonies…

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Electronic Tagging and Tracking Marine Animals Supports Conservation

Understanding and predicting animal movement is important as it is central to establishing effective management and conservation strategies [1]. Until relatively recently, studying the movements and behaviors of highly migratory marine species (turtles, sharks, whales, penguins, seals and billfish) have been challenging due to the logistical and technological constraints of working in aquatic environments. However,…

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Electronic Tagging and Tracking Marine Animals Supports Conservation

Understanding and predicting animal movement is important as it is central to establishing effective management and conservation strategies [1]. Until relatively recently, studying the movements and behaviors of highly migratory marine species (turtles, sharks, whales, penguins, seals and billfish) have been challenging due to the logistical and technological constraints of working in aquatic environments. However,…

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Shark Declines: Fuel for a Decade of Conservation Effort

Shark Declines: Fuel for a Decade of Conservation Effort by Austin J. Gallagher & Neil Hammerschlag     Scientists have been studying the population status of sharks for years and while the vulnerability, threatened status and biological importance of sharks has long-been well-recognized and documented by the research community (1), ten years ago, shark conservation…

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About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

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Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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