Photography

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer   On a late January afternoon the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge trails are quiet,...

From Jan. 9 – 12, the National Geographic Society welcomed renowned photographers for its annual Photography Seminar. The theme of this year’s seminar, “Photography for Change,” reflects the vital contributions photographers have made to National Geographic for almost 130 years as well as the increasingly critical role photography is playing in driving awareness, engagement and progress. Today, there are so many challenges facing our planet, from overpopulation and abuse of our natural resources, to rising geopolitical tensions and poverty. In an age of noise, distraction and speed, photography has an unparalleled ability to command our focus and attention and deliver clarity and truth that cannot be questioned, spun or ignored. Photography cuts through geographic, cultural and political barriers and unites people by creating a universal language of beauty, wonder, sorrow, and joy.

Photography shows us the infinite scale of our planet and universe. At the same time, it is profoundly personal, capturing human emotion in all its rawness and intimacy.

Photography provokes thought, changes perceptions, and evokes compassion.

And, perhaps most importantly, photography makes people take action.

Throughout the week, acclaimed National Geographic photographers including Michael “Nick” Nichols, David Doubilet, Maggie Steber, Ed Kashi, Paul Nicklen and Cristina Mittermeier filled the halls of National Geographic, sharing the power of photography to inspire meaningful action, empower new conservation movements, and make a measurable impact on our planet. These are a few of our favorite images from this powerful week.

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As a child, the idea of finding a long-lost dinosaur was my greatest fantasy. As I grew older and learned more about our amazing biodiversity, the idea of rediscovering a more recently lost species took over. While stumbling across a thylacine or dodo in my home nation of South Africa was unlikely, I was lucky...

  For the first time ever, you’re invited join a live streaming event at National Geographic’s annual Photography Seminar, at 11:45 a.m. and 4:15 p.m., ET, Thursday, Jan. 11, streaming through Facebook Live or Livestream. The Photography Seminar has been going on since 1967, when a group of photographers gathered in a small office at...

Above: A portrait of a Sunda clouded leopard (Photo by Max Allen)   Sunda clouded leopards (Neofelis diardi) are part of the Panthera lineage of felids that includes African lions (Panthera leo), tigers (Panthera tigris), and jaguars (Panthera onca). These are among the most charismatic wildlife species, but Sunda clouded leopards are the least understood...

Photography has been an indispensable tool in National Geographic’s nearly 130-year history of advancing global understanding and inspiring solutions for the greater good. A new exhibition, “Wild: Michael Nichols,” opening at the National Geographic Museum on Oct. 12, exemplifies the profound impact of visual storytelling, with stunning images of wildlife and wild places through the...

WASHINGTON (Oct. 14, 2016)—A group of participants from the Baltimore City Community College Refugee Youth Project (RYP) will learn to tell their stories through photography and writing during National Geographic Photo Camp (NGPC) Shenandoah National Park, Oct. 20-23. The camp, to be held in Shenandoah National Park, is a partnership between the National Geographic Society,...

Today, National Geographic Live announces its fall 2016 season lineup featuring some of the best explorers, photographers and adventurers in their fields. The broad range of programming, which will be presented at National Geographic’s downtown headquarters, continues Nat Geo Live’s long-standing tradition of offering quality events featuring bold people and transformative ideas to multi-generational audiences in the Washington metropolitan...

A group of Apsáalooke (Crow Indian) youth in Montana will learn to tell their stories through photography and writing during National Geographic Photo Camp (NGPC) Montana, June 8-12. The camp, to be held at Little Big Horn Community College on the Crow Native American Reservation in Montana, is a partnership between the National Geographic Society and...

This post is the latest in the series  Kike Calvo’s visual diary as a National Geographic Expert on the South Georgia and Falklands Expedition aboard the National Geographic Explorer.  South Georgia always has a surprise for the explorers of the extreme south. And sometimes beyond the rugged grandeur of its breathtaking glaciers, surprises in the island come...

By Rachel Bruton, National Geographic Staff National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jason de León is on a mission: Take 30 kids from the Arivaca community in southern Arizona and team them up with National Geographic photographers to tell the story of life on the US/Mexico border. The students will come from underserved communities that have grown...

This post is the latest in the series  Kike Calvo’s visual diary as a National Geographic Expert on the South Georgia and Falklands Expedition aboard the National Geographic Explorer.  We made it back to the ship. After two days being exposed to the strong prevailing westerly winds, I can still feel the sensation of resisting...

This post is the first of Kike Calvo’s visual diary as a National Geographic Expert on the South Georgia and Faulklands Expedition aboard the National Geographic Explorer.  As I walked into the National Geographic Explorer I was transported to a space of exploration and discovery.  A soft light was caressing the old atlases, all well lined...