predators

For the first time in history, the majority of humans lives in urbanized areas; more than three billion people reside in cities and suburbs around the world. As we’re moving into town, wild canids — wolves and coyotes, foxes and jackals — are right behind us. Or we’re behind them, sometimes claiming turf they’d already…

Wildlife

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A short stroll before dinner last Thursday yielded a once-in-a-lifetime wildlife sighting—along with the photos necessary to prove that it really happened. The setting was Santa Rosa National Park, a stretch of tropical dry forest within Costa Rica’s spectacular Area de Conservación Guanacaste. I set out from the Park’s main administrative area shortly before 4:00 p.m….

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Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 Sarah and Eric McNair-Landry are a sibling duo who have crossed…

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By Jennifer S. Holland So your cat and dog share a bed, and your parrot and gerbil sometimes nibble at their food side by side. Cute. But a wild bear and a wild wolf hanging out like old friends—even sharing prey? Now that is something special. (See pictures of the pair on the Daily Mail‘s…

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The best things came in small packages for scientists studying Gabon‘s littlest predators. For the first time, a team surveyed the west African country for its small carnivores, a group traditionally overlooked by scientists. The investigation turned up 12 species, including badgers, mongooses, civets, and genets. For their study, the researchers compiled data from animal…

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It may look pretty, but this “orchid” actually has a trick under its, well, leaves—it’s actually a praying mantis trying to get a meal.  Until recently, scientists weren’t sure if this flower mimic was accurate enough to deceive bugs. Now, a new study says it is—and it’s the first scientific evidence of an animal imitating a…

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It may look pretty, but this “orchid” actually has a trick under its, well, leaves—it’s actually a praying mantis trying to get a meal.  Until recently, scientists weren’t sure if this flower mimic was accurate enough to deceive bugs. Now, a new study says it is—and it’s the first scientific evidence of an animal imitating a…

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You’re chatting with someone you find bright and attractive when suddenly they lean a little closer and WHAM! You get hit with a whiff of monster breath. Nothing pulls the plug on attraction, even just social attraction, like a bad bouquet. Plenty of animals will run a mile from a foul stench, too. While camouflage,…

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You’re chatting with someone you find bright and attractive when suddenly they lean a little closer and WHAM! You get hit with a whiff of monster breath. Nothing pulls the plug on attraction, even just social attraction, like a bad bouquet. Plenty of animals will run a mile from a foul stench, too. While camouflage,…

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Bad news for the Tasmanian devil also may mean tough times for another one of Tasmania’s predators, the eastern quoll. Since 1996, the virally transmitted “devil facial tumor disease” has ravaged the Tasmanian devil population. In the areas of the Australian island (map) where the disease has struck, it has killed more than 95 percent of the…

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Bad news for the Tasmanian devil also may mean tough times for another one of Tasmania’s predators, the eastern quoll. Since 1996, the virally transmitted “devil facial tumor disease” has ravaged the Tasmanian devil population. In the areas of the Australian island (map) where the disease has struck, it has killed more than 95 percent of the…

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When we call a person two-faced, it’s an insult. But for some clever animals, being two-faced is a high compliment. Many animals evolve eyespots and even false heads—like the thorny devil—to look more menacing and fake out potential predators. But a 2010 study showed that the deceptive body parts don’t really have to look like anything—just…

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When we call a person two-faced, it’s an insult. But for some clever animals, being two-faced is a high compliment. Many animals evolve eyespots and even false heads—like the thorny devil—to look more menacing and fake out potential predators. But a 2010 study showed that the deceptive body parts don’t really have to look like anything—just…

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Scientists who found two new species of electric fish in the Amazon River were stunned to discover that the two animals are, well, wired much differently. Unlike their relative the electric eel, which can generate a charge of 600 volts, these weakly electric fish, called bluntnose knifefish, produce much smaller electric discharges. While electric eels use…

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